Sculpture

Offering students an emphasis in either traditional practice or interactive media, the sculpture concentration provides both disciplinary focus and an environment for interdisciplinary exploration. Advanced students work independently in individual studio spaces, train at outside arts organizations, and have access to a woodworking shop, a ceramics lab, plaster facilities, interactive media and robotics equipment, in addition to further resources offered by the Department of Fine Arts and the University at large. Students may also apply for the Advanced Sculpture Internship, which provides training in digital fabrication at the LEAP Academy Fabrication Lab. This breadth of training supports graduates with the skills and thinking necessary for careers in today’s diverse and changing art world.

Our emphasis on authorship in the built environment aims to strengthen and focus each student’s sense of personal direction and efficacy within a wide framework of contemporary art practice. Through a course of study that begins with the Sculpture Foundation class, students may take an array of offerings which include ceramics, object making, new media, ecological art, conceptual art, sustainable design, community art and programmable, interactive media. The culmination of work in this concentration is a capstone project. This semester-long investigation in a student elected area of advanced practice, becomes the beginning of a portfolio in fine art. The capstone work is formally shown at the annual Student Thesis Exhibition in a professional gallery space. Beyond professional practice, the ultimate goal of the concentration is to support students to creatively and technically communicate emotions, ideas and inner visions by creating three-dimensional works of art.

For information about the Sculpture concentration, contact Prof. Elizabeth Demaray.

Course Requirements

Core Curriculum (27 credits)

Required for all Art Program concentrations

  • 50:080:102 Visual Fundamentals (3)
  • 50:080:103 Sculpture Foundations (3)
  • 50:080:331 Graphic Design I (3)
  • 50:080:221 Drawing I (3)
  • 50:080:351 Painting I (3)
  • 50:080:279 Computer Animation (3)
  • 50:080:264 Digital Photography (3)
  • 50:082:102 Introduction to Art History II (3)
  • 50:082:354 Contemporary Art (3) or other upper lever Art History course

Sculpture Concentration (21 credits)

Required:

  • 50:080:211 Ceramics I (3)
  • 50:080:126 Conceptual Art I (3)
  • 50:080:214 Interactive Art I (3)
  • 50:080:382 Sculpture II (3)
  • 50:080:481 Advanced Sculpture (3)
  • 50:080:478 Sculpture Capstone (3)

Chose One Depending on Student’s Emphasis:

  • 50:700:129 Biodesign I (3)
  • 50:080:212 Ceramics II (3)
  • 50:080:326 Conceptual Art II (3)
  • 50:080:314 Interactive Art II (3)
  • 50:080:224 New Media Art (3)
  • 50:080:283 Sculpture Workshop (3)
  • 50:080:300 Art and Urban Sustainability (3)
  • 50:080:391 Independent Study in Sculpture (3)
  • 50:080:490 Special Topics in Sculpture (3)

Offering students an emphasis in either traditional practice or interactive media, the sculpture concentration provides both disciplinary focus and an environment for interdisciplinary exploration. Advanced students work independently in individual studio spaces, train at outside arts organizations, and have access to a woodworking shop, a ceramics lab, plaster facilities, interactive media and robotics equipment, in addition to further resources offered by the Department of Fine Arts and the University at large. Students may also apply for the Advanced Sculpture Internship, which provides training in digital fabrication at the LEAP Academy Fabrication Lab. This breadth of training supports graduates with the skills and thinking necessary for careers in today’s diverse and changing art world.

Our emphasis on authorship in the built environment aims to strengthen and focus each student’s sense of personal direction and efficacy within a wide framework of contemporary art practice. Through a course of study that begins with the Sculpture Foundation class, students may take an array of offerings which include ceramics, object making, new media, ecological art, conceptual art, sustainable design, community art and programmable, interactive media. The culmination of work in this concentration is a capstone project. This semester-long investigation in a student elected area of advanced practice, becomes the beginning of a portfolio in fine art. The capstone work is formally shown at the annual Student Thesis Exhibition in a professional gallery space. Beyond professional practice, the ultimate goal of the concentration is to support students to creatively and technically communicate emotions, ideas and inner visions by creating three-dimensional works of art.

For information about the Sculpture concentration, contact Prof. Elizabeth Demaray.

Course Requirements

Core Curriculum (27 credits)

Required for all Art Program concentrations

  • 50:080:102 Visual Fundamentals (3)
  • 50:080:103 Sculpture Foundations (3)
  • 50:080:331 Graphic Design I (3)
  • 50:080:221 Drawing I (3)
  • 50:080:351 Painting I (3)
  • 50:080:279 Computer Animation (3)
  • 50:080:264 Digital Photography (3)
  • 50:082:102 Introduction to Art History II (3)
  • 50:082:354 Contemporary Art (3) or other upper lever Art History course

Sculpture Concentration (21 credits)

Required:

  • 50:080:211 Ceramics I (3)
  • 50:080:126 Conceptual Art I (3)
  • 50:080:214 Interactive Art I (3)
  • 50:080:382 Sculpture II (3)
  • 50:080:481 Advanced Sculpture (3)
  • 50:080:478 Sculpture Capstone (3)

Chose One Depending on Student’s Emphasis:

  • 50:700:129 Biodesign I (3)
  • 50:080:212 Ceramics II (3)
  • 50:080:326 Conceptual Art II (3)
  • 50:080:314 Interactive Art II (3)
  • 50:080:224 New Media Art (3)
  • 50:080:283 Sculpture Workshop (3)
  • 50:080:300 Art and Urban Sustainability (3)
  • 50:080:391 Independent Study in Sculpture (3)
  • 50:080:490 Special Topics in Sculpture (3)

Student  Gallery 

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